FeedbackWe know when we win a deal, but do we ask why when we don’t?  If you miss this step for your business, the potential for improvement of your kitchen sales process will not take hold.

“Take this content, make it your own, and follow up…”

The questions below, which should be worded to meet your business needs, are examples of the type of follow up needed for both those who do and do not buy. Typically, these questions are done in a phone interview by someone other than the salesperson involved. Most businesses treat this as a function of marketing, not sales.

After all, continuous improvement is about reviewing all processes for your kitchen and bath business; those that work and those that don’t. Take this content, make it your own, and follow up for each consumer you touch.

Meet Phase (Initial Showroom Meeting)

Grade the following on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being Strongly Agree and 1 being Strongly Disagree:

5-Strongly Agree        4-Agree         3-No Opinion         2-Disagree         1-Strongly Disagree

  1. I quickly became comfortable with my salesperson.
  2. I view this salesperson as a knowledgeable and valuable resource.
  3. The salesperson understood my budget and ideas for the project.
  4. The salesperson educated me on products, installation and other important considerations that might affect my project.
  5. The salesperson understood my plans for completing this project.
  6. The salesperson clearly explained how we will work together and communicated specific next steps.

Measure Phase (Initial In-Home Meeting)

Grade the following on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being Strongly Agree and 1 being Strongly Disagree:

5-Strongly Agree        4-Agree         3-No Opinion         2-Disagree         1-Strongly Disagree

  1. I felt I could talk openly and honestly with my salesperson.
  2. I felt the salesperson really understands my wants and needs.
  3. I was favorably impressed by their initial ideas.
  4. I feel my salesperson understood my preferences and priorities.
  5. The salesperson set clear expectations of what would happen next and when.

Match Phase (First Presentation of Plans)

Grade the following on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being Strongly Agree and 1 being Strongly Disagree:

5-Strongly Agree        4-Agree         3-No Opinion         2-Disagree         1-Strongly Disagree

  1. My salesperson showed me a solution that excited me.
  2. My salesperson clearly communicated how their design would provide me with the benefits I wanted.
  3. The salesperson showed me three designs that were close to my budget.
  4. The salesperson clearly understood the timing of my project.
  5. The salesperson set clear next steps with an associated time frame.

Make the Deal Phase (Closing)

Grade the following on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being Strongly Agree and 1 being Strongly Disagree:

5-Strongly Agree        4-Agree         3-No Opinion         2-Disagree         1-Strongly Disagree

  1. The salesperson was patient in answering my final questions.
  2. The salesperson had all the paperwork that needed to be completed well organized and easy to complete.
  3. I decided not to move the project forward. If yes, please explain.
  4. I decided to purchase from this salesperson.  If yes, please explain.
  5. I decided to purchase from an alternative vendor.  If yes, please explain.
  6. Any other comments or suggestions that may help us refine our process?

By asking the proper questions, you’ll be able to solve all mysteries instantly. Taking the time to follow up with customers (and lost customers) will help you to learn where your strengths and weaknesses lie, so you can perfect your process going forward.

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